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and focus on just one section about demands on the burke that in europe. quince not very long ago americans and europeans pride themselves on religious toleration and understanding. and animosity and violence including such bloody episodes as the wars of religion, including as well be quieter violence of colonial religious domination by europeans in many parts of the world and added to that, domestic anti-semitism and anti catholicism and culminating in the horrors of nazism which implicated not only germany but many other nations as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketp
the systems of canada and other parts of europe like having a single-payer take care of all medical expenses? 's been a good question. we could probably be here quite some time to answer. from our vantage point, what we see if this is somehow works in canada and it does not have the care level here in the united states. even in the european countries like the u.k., they too have a one payer system. what happens it is cause long lines and health care is delayed in getting to people in the result is a dear. it is a more simpler model under one roof or an ape in a society that can access care at a single point and village across the platform as a whole. we were governmental sponsored plan because it does not encourage innovation and does not encourage competitive aspects. we hope you will get better going forward. >> slightly off-topic, [laughter] >> mr. brousard, i want to comment and give you some background first. i am a humana -- prescriber through my wife's retirement. and generally very satisfied with the program, particularly enjoy the silver sneakers relationship to encourage exercise.
hikes, europe's grand experiment with taxing the rich more is falling apart, especially in france and britain. and here at home, california and new york are passing through the 50% tax rate barrier. is anybody looking at how tax hikes fail the test of economic growth? >>> back here in the u.s., could it be michigan which used to call itself the worker's paradise union state is now moving towards new anti-union right-to-work legislation and it looks like it's going to pass? but first up, budget talks resume between speaker john boehner and president obama today. with just 25 days to go, let's keep tabs on where we stand. reports of a conservative backlash against speaker boehner simply not true. he has the solid support of his leadership and the rank and file. but there is concern among some in the gop that they are at risk of becoming the party for rich people while president obama and democrats stake their claim on the middle class. and my tax rate flexibility with higher -- here's what the president said earlier today. >> i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevent pr
're cleaner than europe is right now. >> right. >> so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following, that if the republicans and democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff you will need an external force, a major market sell-off, you will need a major economic trauma to get them to poex. >> other things have been on the table. i want to talk to our viewers about a few of those as soon as we come back. coming up next, republicans want a new formula for inflation. it's called chained cpi. not a bad idea overall but it could slow the payments to social security recipients. the president has said he could agree to it but democrat lawmakers say no way. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inf
. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talked about a single- minded focus, yet you are leaving with jobs undone. how do you feel about leaving at this particular point in time? >> we still have several weeks. we have laid out the plans and all these efforts i have been part of and other efforts as well. i still have some optimism that we will get this job done. one of the reasons i did not run again is the really wanted to focus these last two years. i knew if i was running, i would not be able to be in the hundreds of hours of negotiations i have been in. i believe many of the ideas we have generated will be part of any solution, whether it comes before the end of this year or early next year. i believe the work product we have produced will be part of the solution. >> you talked about no longer missing a 80% of family birthdays. what will you be doing then? >> i will be doing some speaking and doing some teaching. i have people starting to talk to me about other opportunities. i can assure you
, but we are cleaner than europe is right now. so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following. if the republicans and the democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff, then you will need an external force, you will need major market selloff. you will need a major economic trauma to get them to focus. >> there are other things that have been on the table. i want to talk about a few of those, as soon as we come back. coming up, the republicans want a new formula for inflation, it's called chained cpi, it could slow the growth in payments to social security recipients, that's got some people mad. the president has said he could agree do it, but democratic lawmakers say no way. [ bells dinging ] ♪ hark how the bells, sweet silver bells ♪ ♪ all seem to say throw care away ♪ ♪ from everywhere, filling the air ♪ [ female announcer ] chex party mix. easy 15-minute homemade recipes you just pop in a microwave. like caramel chocolate drizzles. happier holidays. chex party mix. happier holidays. santho, ho, ho!anta! santa! want to see some magic? watch this! merry c
and melissa lee. questions remain about the internals. europe is reacting to a miss on german industrial production and some reports at least that some ecb members favored a rate cut yesterday. our road map will go like this. that puzzling jobs number beating virtually every wall street estimate as the labor department says sandy had only a minimal effect. is it true a clean number and what are conspiracy theorists saying. >>> a comment hastings made last july. what does it say about s.e.c. rules and whether they are out of date. >> mcdonald's will post same store sales on monday gets an upgrade to buy taking the forecast to a street high after surveying franchisees. we begin with november jobs number. 146,000 nonfarm jobs added last month above forecast of 80,000. october and september payrolls were revised lower. unemployment rate fell by 0.2 to 7.7. that's the lowest in four years. the dip occurring mostly because more people stopped looking for work and were not counted as unemployed. as for hurricane sandy, the labor department says the storm did not substantively impact the novembe
with christine lagarde from the imf. i asked about the reforms that were taking place in europe. i asked, would any of these reforms be taking place without europe being in a fiscal crisis mode? her answer was, absolutely not. unless the revolver is at the temple of the politicians with the finger on the trigger, they're not capable of summoning the collective will to tell the people that represent that they need to take steps to resolve a problem and will cause disappointment and pain to do so. my experience in the years i have had in politics was exactly that. we never would have gotten what we did in 2011 without the threat of defaulting on our debt. to think that we could put a structure in place today that perhaps we would all be comfortable with in terms of solving our long-term problems and be assured that 10 years or not that congress would not have modified that dozens of times to the response of into joints who are banging on the door and saying this is to develop much pain, we could hardly sustain a policy for months around here, let alone 10 years. if you want to fix the long-term s
's mentioning that the feds started a two-day meeting here. that's not a big issue. europe, though, are we seeing signs of stress again with the concerns about leadership in italy, and problems in greece, and should we pay attention to that than the fiscal cliff discussions? >> well, you know, right now, doesn't seem like the market is paying attention to that right now. it reminds me a lot of september, before the election, when the s&p's rallied. everything was con taped. we were worried about central bank, liquidity, numbers okayed here, heating up in china. people thought europe was contained, and it feels that way now. people looking past the headlines whether it's the fiscal cliff or europe. i mean, there's a lot of doom day sayers out there, and it makes sense, but it seems like everything right now is contained, and the trade is up to the upside. david: right. liz mentioned the fed decision coming up, should be hearing about it tomorrow. what's the market expecting from the fed? in what way will they be excited or disappointed? >> well, i think the market, if you look at the option
to europe. remember this fella here over my shoulder there? silvio berlusconi. a billionaire prime minister of italy elected three times even though as they say in rome, he was corrupt. >> the italian prime minister is no stranger to scandal. charges of bribery, corruption and embezzlement. >> officially guilty of tax fraud. >> sentenced to newshour years in prison for tax fraud. >> a serial flanderer. >> tales of lavish orgies. >> notorious all night so-called bunga-bunga parties. paying for sex with an underage prostitute. >> he was saying he could haven't sex with 11 women so instead he had sex with eight women. (laughter). >> jon: a man who had sex with eight women. that's the worst bond villain ever! (laughter) and if you pull one of them off, you just grow back. last november with the italian economy tanking, voters replaced berlusconi with his polar opposite, mario monti, an academic economist who promised to balance italy's books with strict austerity measures. that's not an easy choice. the country basically deciding it would be better to live with its hard-ass stepfather even thou
numbering your money back from europe being 30% you might make it 10%. a lot of money would come back to the u.s. and it would be good for the economy. dave: don't mean to pouu water and your idea because i agree with you it would be a great idea to have a tax holiday we have it ministrations people want from the chief economic adviser of the president on down with the administration and they say no way they are going to do this. would give the any optimism it might be done? >> people need revenue. this is positive for revenue. the money sits over cease and the u.s. treasury gets none of it. if you declare this tax holiday the money produces revenue in nd the u.s.. the change of administration at some point. dave: are you hearing anything about this? we ask the administration specifically about this, they say we won't let it happen. >> that is what we heard. they are not going to let it happen but it would be great if they did because of what has already been pointed out. we need to spur this economy and of the fiscal cliff developed and small-businesses our hits we have to have growt
into what you think your version should be for adopting the paa that's why europe into asia because leaders here said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> you asked a lot of questions in there. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was built as a research and development platform. it was not designed to be in the long term missile ballistic architecture. there's benefit in research and development, but since it was built, my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the capabilities have grown, and it's grown globally so that the need to have diminished because they are mature of enough to have it. as far as the intercepters to be productive, you have to look across the technologies that we pursue, and recognize that the significant technology challenges that have been associated with that program, and really, i think you have to -- in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've done the technology part of the -- of this ballistic missile defense have done amazing things in that time frame, t
deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the
the previous panel talk about state government, and one of the big problems in europe is that there is no fiscal coordination among the independent countries, and somewhat to our state, and who has to come along and bail them out when they have not done what they are supposed to do. i don't know that we're all that much different so we have a great panel. people that are far smarter than i am, and i'm going to introduce them all, and ask questions, and i'll ask the pam to keep answers relatively short so we can get through a lot of questions, and still get out of here on time. first of all, we have ali son frasier, director of thomas a. rowe institute for economic studies at the heritage foundation. director -- as director, she oversees the heritage foundation research on a wide range of domestic, economic issues incoming federal spending, taxes, the debt, and the deficit. before joining heritage in 2003, she was deputy director of the oklahoma office of state finance where she worked for governor frank keating. next on the panel, we have the institute fellow and the r
will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate jig there are a lot of reasonable proposals being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenu
it is in europe or in asia. and i don't know personally how you grow a real economy without being able to produce goods in a competitive way. i think that it's important to also understand that there are so many factors that go into the adequacy of an educational system. you've referred to consolidation. absolutely critical. and new york state, 650 school districts. a lot of them, each of whom has their -- has one school bus or some of whom have one school bus and a commissioner transportation. >> oklahoma as tiny as we are have 521 school districts. >> that is a very tough nut politically. because education is always local. and always wants to make sure her kid gets on the football team. and it's hard to change that. but there's enormous, enormous redundancy in expenditures there. and that has to be addressed. also, the nature of the population varies. and that has an impact on the quality of education. and the ability of schools to teach. and the same time we have to recognize that 50 years ago, we had -- there weren't very many opportunities for women. there weren't very many women running sta
in europe, greece was the problem child that spent too much, saved nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to power? bashar al assad was under even more intense pressure to step down but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition, civilians caught in the crossfire, more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> reporter: this is yet another bread line. >> the opposition fights on, making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of support from the international community. number one, she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shot malala yousafzai. she survived, wake up in a british hospital and, according to her father, immediately asked for her school books. the world was gripped, moved and inspired by the story of one determined young girl facing do
and grow when the entitlement culture become permanent like europe. of the last one. you are a young man surrounded by people the same age. when you come out and talk like you are talking now what is the reaction? >> a lot of the marston's. they never heard it before especially from teachers across the country. they never heard the tenets of capitalism in our schools and that is what our group turningpoint usa is doing. i go to lecture halls and high school band is about talking about the morality of capitalism versus the morality of government dependency and i truly believe young people want to be free. young people want to make their decisions and because of that there is hope. stuart: if you ever come in your queue set on the set with us because we like what you have to say. good stuff indeed. thank you. you want to add anything to that? you are the ceo when you hired these youngsters. >> i agree. stuart: do you seeethat entitlement mentality in the work force, the young work force that is coming in? >> i see and that mentality, i don't agree with the president on his position on enti
've seen the spread of democracy from central europe to southeast asia and from latin america to the middle east. hundreds of millions of people have been lifted out of poverty in places like china, india and just about every other corner of the globe. and technological advances have transformed over almost every aspect of our daily lives. when i started here in the senate, it lacked. was a fruit and tweaking was something only earth day. no more. none of these extraordinary developments have been by accident. in fact, to a significant degree, i would say they were made possible by the principled leadership of the united states, by the global economy and international system that america created with our diplomacy and protected with paramilitary and by the unique culture of freedom, innovation and entrepreneurship flourishes in our country and that remains the model and inspiration for the rest of the modernizing world. we have every reason to be proud of the progress of humanity that has happened on americas watch and hear at home to be grateful for the countless ways in which our own coun
it should be for adapting the paa that is in europe into asia? because leaders here said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> you ask a lot of questions in there. [laughter] well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was billed as a research and develop a platform. it wasn't designed to be in a long-term ballistic missile defense architecture. still has a benefit in research and development, but since it was built in my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the capabilities have grown, and has grown globally so that the need to have sbx in that role has diminished over time because of the capabilities -- other capabilities are mature enough to be able not to have it. as far as the ability for the interceptors to be productive, i think it to look across all of technologies as we pursue in bmd, and recognize the significant technological challenges that have been associated with that program, and really i think, in the timeframe that we have had to develop these systems, i think we have done the technological part of this ballistic missile defens
cannot the other way around. and this makes as special among the nations of europe. our government has no power, expt that granted it by the people. it is time to check and reverse the growth of govenment, which shows signs of having grown beyond the consent of the governed. it is my intention to curb the size and influence of the federal establishment and to demand recognition of the distinction between the powers granted to the federal government and those reserves to the states or to the people. [applause] lou: reagan's original february 1981 plan proposed in that speech, enough cuts to bring spending down to 19 percentnt of gdp by 1984 ando balance the budget. the federal government started the 2013 budget year with a $292 billion deficit in the first two months. the nation not exactly on incorrect path to what was the reagan vision three decades ago. >> this is what democracy looks like. lou: a union demonstration turned violent. michig state pro worker law cutting in to union dues. unions don't like it. one of their state legislativ supporters says, there will be blood. we will s
. too bad nobody told the navy. student loan debt is a tremendous. they do it in europe that could get a lot of kids out of hot water. they have the number two country hit in the country. that's on this thursday on "fox & friends" starting in 12 minutes. take effect in january. >> the number of americans on food stamps is up 39 percent since president obama took office. should cutting that program be part of the discussion about the to 47.7 million. >> it is a guaranteed thing. it's an entitlement program. that means if you meet the income qualifications the government must give you the money whether the government has any money to give you or not. if they don't they have to borrow it. >> that's right spending on food stamps which hit nearly $75 billion in fiscal year 2012 is currently nonnegotiable. it is exempt from sequestration should it quick in. it is not on the table as part of the efforts to negotiate closing the growing gap between revenue and spending. the u.s. department of agriculture which administers the program said quote the increase in precipitation during the 2008 to
.s. economic data. none on top today. we're looking at a flat open across the board. as for europe, movement there. the buyback of greek debt will in fact work. we're seeing just fractions of a percent in terms of changes there. our road map this morning starts with the latest in the fiscal cliff negotiations. the white house promptly rebuffs the gop counterproposal which calls for $800 billion in new tax revenue but without tax rate increases for the wealthy. could this tax issue deadlock the talks? >>> bank of america ceo warns the cliff must get stalled or the economy could be stifled well into 2014. >>> even more dividends pushed into 2012. coach, american eagle moving up and oracle will play out three-quarters of dividends this year. >>> more strength in housing this morning. toll brothers earnings top expectations. we'll begin with the fiscal cliff. governors are set to meet today with the president and congressional leaders. governors are concerned about the impact of deficit reduction measures on their state budgebu. the latest gop offer would overhaul the tax code, raise $800 billio
of the next 10, 15 and 20 years. some people look to europe and say austerity there is not working. and i agree. an austerity program that's too quick can only make our problems worse. but i also see parts of europe that said by kicking the can down the road they can ignore their problems. and the only thing worse than austerity is the bond markets forcing a crisis upon your economy, forcing a crisis that would make a divide between spending and revenues more unsustainable. if we wait 3 years, 5 years, 10 years, 12 years from now we will be unable to safely deal with these problems. that's why we need a balanced and responsible deal now. after the election, many of my colleagues, particularly those on the republican side, have sort of publicly acknowledged that we need new revenue, has to be part of the solution. i believe even some of the numbers the president put forward in terms of revenue goals are too modest in terms of of what is needed to be put back into the revenue stream not to grow the size of government but to simply pay our bills. it is critically important that this new reve
while high while illegal research shows more drivers are toking up. studies like this one in europe show too much marijuana affects coordination and judgment. >> a reduced ability to divide one's attention. >> reporter: marijuana advocates argue marijuana is less debilitating than alcohol. but a new study shows those who drive within 3 hours of smoking pot are at a greater risk of causing a crash. >> it inhibits the ability to jump the judge time and distance. >> reporter: in state where marijuana is legal, the level is 5 man or grams. the impairment some argue is equal to alcohol. >> it's difficult to determine whether that five nanograms will change. >> reporter: heavy users though not impaired can test positive weeks after smoking. also what you smoke and how you smoke it affects people differently. even experts don't know how much pot causes impairment. >> two dosages would give me 5 nanograms. it's impossible to make that determination. >> reporter: the bottom line is this is going to be litigated. the pot people want it at 10 nanograms and it's at 5. megyn: coming up. how does amer
a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it creates a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage of government spending is more than its should be related to total gdp. if there is an easier for millet in the history of economics that more american energy equals more american jobs, i don't know what it is. it is all the jobs you have if you of a reliable supply of energy. the front page of the "the wall street journal" indicates a difficulty of connecting this cheap product we have in natural gas. we thought we would run out natural-gas as a country. connecting this cheap product with a more expensive market and getting it overseas. if we could become energy self- sufficien
the confidence of investors around the world that america is getting its act together at a time when europe is struggling, at the time when japan is struggling and slowing down, when china growth is slowing, the world is looking to the united states to take the lead. as it has so many times in so many crises before. yet all they see is the stand-off and the inability to do what i think we all need to do. now, the choice is very clear. we have come to the point where i think most people looking at this understand that if we don't act now, the so-called kicking the can down the road no longer is a viable opportunity. no longer is something that we can afford to do. there's a group called kick it back, and i can see why the american people are frustrated over our inability to come to some agreement on this. and so obviously we hope that the president and speaker boehner will bring us that grand bargain by which we can evaluate and address before the end of the year. now, i have frequently said from this podium and back to the people that i represent in indiana that if we don't start with addre
only industrial country that came out of second world war intact. europe was on its knees. germany and japan were rubble so we thought that was the natural order of things. it wasn't. and when the other industrial countries recovered we got world competition as we have. we ran into bankruptcies. chrysler now twice. we see that in the southern states where the transplants are without the unions. they weren't the ones who went bankrupt last -- in 2008 and 2009. so it really is a choice. it's a tough choice. and i sympathize with the unions but the fact is that in the global economy where you have to compete on wages and other elements, of the units of production, can you either have, you know, high wages with low employment or you can, as obama would say, spread around the wealth. the fact is that in the right-to-work states, unemployment is 6.9%. >> we have a graphic that shows right-to-work vs. non-right to work statements on employment, go ahead. >> and in the other stays the non-right-to-work it's 8.7. so you can choose to have fewer workers who enjoy higher inflated unnatural, i
>> credit rating was reduced. >> we don't want to end up like europe. lou: great to see you both. now time for your h comments. writing into their hope barack obama gets all the taxes he wants. i'll bthe first to say i toldd you so when the consequence happens.n t people learn the hard way.n obama never negotiate, he just demands something of complaints. when he doesn't get what he wants. he is far more mature than that, don't you think? we will keep thinking about that. thank you for your comments. we love hearing from you. we love hearing from you. >>> a massive winter storm wreaks havoc bringing blinding snow and devastang tornadoes. at least six are dead, over a thousand flights canceled nationwide stranding holiday travelers and worries things could get worse. welcome, i'm eric bolling in for neil cavuto and this is your world and we're tracking a deadly winter storm as it makes its way towards the east coast. in indiana, heavy snow stranding dozens of vehicles asolkseal with blizzard. a foot in bloming to know. across the south and southst 34 twisters leveled homes. in miss
to their country of origin. >>> this is the most-watched singing contest in europe. it's got the glitz, the glamour, but -- >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly, you get a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms. >> wow. what some european countries on the verge of bankruptcy, many feel participating in the contest, well, strikes the wrong chord. through diet and exercise, alli can help you lose one more by blocking some of the fat you eat. let's fight fat with alli. ♪ i get congested. but now, with zyrtec-d®, i have the proven allergy relief of zyrtec®, plus a powerful decongestant. zyrtec-d® lets me breath freer, so i can love the air. [ male announcer ] zyrtec-d®. behind the pharmacy counter. no prescription needed. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super s
volunteered to be in the ambulance service. what he did when he got to europe was rescue and pick up other dough boys in europe out of those trenches and get them behind, take them back behind american lines so that they could be taken care of their wounds and he also picked up many of our americans, 114,000 to be exact that died in the great world war i. he was allowed or was able to come back to america alive he made it through the war. although many, as i mentioned, did not. many americans when they came home from the great war over there, as cohen said, difed the new. they picked up in europe in fact many of them a great number of them depride the spanish flu, almost as many as died in europe itself. frank buckles then went to work and during his work, he went to the philippines. when he was in the philippines, the japanese invaded in world war ii. he was captured and put in a prisoner of war camp for three and a half years. he was about to be executed and the americans came and liberated the camp and he along with the other prisoners of war came back to america. frank buckles went bac
cliff and a slowdown in the world's economy and in asia and in europe. so these are the three factors that have come together to give us a sustained drop in the price of gasoline almost over the last three weeks, wolf. >> is this a short-term development? what's in store over the longer term? >> we're into that lower driving season. obviously, spring and summer are bigger driving seasons. you'll see a pickup in demand when we get back into spring. that typically happens. a lot of it depends on the price of oil. that depends on what happens in the world economy. there are two things happening. one is the fiscal cliff. and the recession in europe. if things continue to slow down economically, we'll see less demand for gasoline. if there's more tension in the middle east, we'll see higher prices for oil. those are two things that could affect the price of oil, which will affect the price of gasoline. one thing to remember, that over the last ten years or so, wolf, demand for gasoline has started to drop off, as cars have become more efficient and as we've become better conservers. you'll
of eastern europe has become very differentiated. the don't even have much in common with one another. >> more with an applebaum on life in poland and hungary. tonight at 8:00. >> on thursday, local officials from york and new jersey urged congress to approve a supplemental funding for its cities affected by hurricane cindy. two officials with the small business administration testified. this is one hour and 45 minutes. >> good morning. thank you for joining us today to discuss the small business administration's response to hurricane sandy. i've of like to thank our witnesses that will be testifying in just a moment. i will introduce them in just a moment. let me make a couple of opening statements. we are here today to evaluate the response and recovery effort in the aftermath of hurricane same day as the largest ice storm in u.s. history. hurricane zandi claimed the lives of 130 to americans, it damaging and destroying more than 600,000 homes and 459,000 businesses leaving more than 8.5 million families with out fire or running water. most of the power grid has been turned back on.
europe and asia in terms of our -- in terms of our national natural gas. but it creates a better economy, high revenues that reduces the debt. >> senator, the same question to you. i'm wondering, this headline recently predicting that we're going to be -- the united states could be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. i mean, this is something almost unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government from here on out, given that? >> i think the role of the federal government is to do things that encourage exactly that result and to follow up a little bit on the question of fiscal cliff, part of the way that you saw this fiscal problem issue grow our relative position in the economy relative to everybody else's. one of our big problems right now is the percentage of government spending is way more than it should be relative to total g.d.p. and part of that is because you don't have the growth in g.d.p. that the right kind of energy policies would produce. if there's an easier formula ever in the history of economics than more american energy equals more
period, those are just in europe. let's see if we can agree on a couple things. do you agree that when i was a kid or when you were a kid, there was 340 parts per million of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere? >> sure. it's rising. what's your point? >> so here's the point, is it's rising extraordinarily fast. that's the difference between the bad old days and now. >> carbon dioxide -- >> much faster than ever in history. >> let him finish, mark. let him finish. >> it's the rate that's of great concern more than the actual -- >> what do you put that rate down to, bill? >> it's human activity. you go back -- this is what i say all the time. you look at the ice and you find bubbles of trapped gas from 200 years ago, let alone 1,000 years ago. there's nobody running around with a hypodermic needle injecting bubbles of gas in ancient ice cores. that's the ancient atmosphere in there so you can determine the co composition quite accurately. >> what are the biggest factors, the man-made factors creating the acceleration of co2 in the atmosphere? >> the biggest thing is when i was 9 years old, th
with the challenges in europe, with china going through a transition, with india's political system, as chair of the india caucus, almost more this functional than ours. we look pretty darn good if we can put a real plan in place. >> what would be the size of the plan? >> i think it gets north of $4 trillion, whether it gets to $6 trillion. this goes back to where you start. two points -- kind of on the opening round questions. it is important to remember that the simpson-bowles plan, which has gained a lot of attention, or the gang of six, which is built off the simpson- bowles, the presumptions that went into those plans assumed that all the top rates would go back up. when you start from that, even though i think simpson-bowles's idea that he would bring the rates down to the high 20's is a bit of a stretch. i do not think we will see that kind of across the board almost zeroing out in some places of tax expenditures that would require. they can show a path towards meaningful tax reform even with the rates at the higher level. point two, and this is one of the things where i think those of
-- if you can't force workers to join them, outlawed a whole range of tools that workers in europe and other places use to organize, right. there are two sides of the act and all these pieces of legislation. >> i don't know. if i think if your argument is good enough your union is strong and make a better deal for your workers you're going to join people to join. >> it's always better to free ride. >> we've also expanded the ability of businesses, of corporations to inva against having union organizing. >> and intimidate. >> dessertify unions and intimidate people. what capital wants is the cheapest possible work it can buy. >> look at walmart. a great case. walmart does not pay its workers a living wage, not the minimum, $25,000 a year for going by federal poverty measurements and if they did they would lift hundreds of workers -- >> retail wages used to support a lifestyle. >> you can understand where governor snyder is coming from. sees businesses locating in indiana because of this. >> michigan has a amazing job creation and business relocation record in the last ten years. >> if you jus
in the economy. certainly europe's not any help. what's happening in china and japan is not any help. then you add on top of it what's coming out of washington. i don't think you should get your hopes up about figuring it out before the end of this year. i think there's a pretty deept chance we go over the cliff and then try to sort it out in the beginning of the year. >> lovely. >> joe, when did 146,000 jobs become good? have we become so pessimistic -- have our expectations come so low we're cheering 146,000 when we should be well over 200? >> plus the downward revisions for the previous two months. >> although, those revisions were almost all in government. mandy makes a good point. 150,000 a month, which has been the average over the past is a months or so, is not great. if this was a normal recovery, we'd be growing at 4% instead of 2 on gdp. employment would be well over 250. however, the good news in today's report was if you look at the household survey, there was clearly a hurricane effect in these numbers. we might actually have printed over 200 absent hurricane sandy. i would argue
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